Hi. I'm Sue Ball.

heidisaman:

"The less money you take, the more freedom you have. I’ve never made a film where I don’t have final cut. And I can’t imagine doing that. That just seems like it would be turmoil. I edit because that’s where you learn how to direct, really. All the answers of what you should have done are in the editing. I miss out on being able to be in a conversation with someone, and I can see where that can be a really valuable thing—to have someone with more of a distance to be having a dialogue with. You write alone, and scouting is really lonely. Then you do this really intense thing with a lot of people. Afterwards, I usually feel like I want to hide away with my film again and go through the process of making sure that every possible thing has been tried. I’m a big believer in letting your film be bad for a while, and not trying to get to a good cut too quickly. I just want to be involved and I want that process, because it makes me think of what lens I should have used or what I should have done. It’s such a learning experience that I hate to miss out on it."
— Kelly Reichardt on why she edits her own films
Still from Wendy and Lucy (2008, dir. Kelly Reichardt) 

heidisaman:

"The less money you take, the more freedom you have. I’ve never made a film where I don’t have final cut. And I can’t imagine doing that. That just seems like it would be turmoil. I edit because that’s where you learn how to direct, really. All the answers of what you should have done are in the editing. I miss out on being able to be in a conversation with someone, and I can see where that can be a really valuable thing—to have someone with more of a distance to be having a dialogue with. You write alone, and scouting is really lonely. Then you do this really intense thing with a lot of people. Afterwards, I usually feel like I want to hide away with my film again and go through the process of making sure that every possible thing has been tried. I’m a big believer in letting your film be bad for a while, and not trying to get to a good cut too quickly. I just want to be involved and I want that process, because it makes me think of what lens I should have used or what I should have done. It’s such a learning experience that I hate to miss out on it."

— Kelly Reichardt on why she edits her own films

Still from Wendy and Lucy (2008, dir. Kelly Reichardt) 

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

*June 2014
Venice Beach, CA

*June 2014

Venice Beach, CA

FISH TANK Trailer

Most of the films I take the time to write anything about are films I love. Because I know what I am looking for when I seek out works to watch, it is no surprise that most of what I watch I like very much. THIS film, however, I loved so much that I quite frankly could not write anything about it immediately upon watching it, because I felt that whatever I could come up with to say about it, wouldn’t be good enough. This film now lives on my “all time fave films” list. I’m not going to go into any kind of real analysis here, nor am I going to pick apart “the plot” or go into any real interpretation of the unbelievably great acting work in it. I am just going to tell you that, for me, good art often involves telling the secrets of your soul. Spilling what you know so fully that there is an element of embarrassment, even shame involved in sharing. You can almost hear the director, Andrea Arnold, saying, “thank God for art” here. And I say “almost” because this work is so seamless that you live inside of it and you think of it days later while brushing your teeth and while tying your shoe, and you aren’t thinking of the “art” part of it at all. Rather, you are thinking of the humanity and of the depth of painful beauty that lives and hides
behind every single moment ever.

(Source: youtube.com)

50ish year old sunburned billy idol haired guy at table next to me in coffee shop is telling a wide-eyed 25 year old that if he wants to be a “permanent staff member at the gym,” he needs “to step up his game” and “stop hanging out with the going nowhere part timers like Luke and Derek.”

people in the neighborhood

*los angeles 2014